VMAN31

PHOTOGRAPHY BENJAMIN LENNOX

STYLIST TOM VAN DORPE

CREDITS ARTICLE CONTENTS

HIGHER LEARNING

HBD KIM NOORDA

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EXTRA CREDITS

Hair Mark Hampton (Julian Watson Agency)  Grooming Dotti using Malin + Goetz (Streeters)  Models  Felix Reiss (DNA), Jan Aeberhard (NY Models), Kyle Mobus (Re:Quest), Abel Van Oeveren (VNY), Felix Liljefors and Kirill (Wilhelmina)  Digital technician Adam Leon  Prop stylist Eli Metcalf (Marek & Associates)  Photo assistants Ben Beagent, James  Broadribb, Corey Jenkins, Ben Mills  Stylist assistant Carrie Weidner  Hair assistants Tim and Yasuhiro  Grooming assistants Katie Robinson and Laura Stiassni  Production Bo Zhang (Management Artists)  Prop stylist assistants Brian Bustos and Roy Delgado  Retouching upperstudio.co.uk  Location Lightbox-NY  Catering Green Catering

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NOSTALGHIA BACKSTAGE: HOUSE OF DAGMAR F/W \'14 FURVERTS SWEET SIXTEEN

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PHOTOGRAPHY BENJAMIN LENNOX
FASHION TOM VAN DORPE

THE FORCE IS STRONG WITH THESE ONES. MEET THREE MAVERICK DESIGNERS CHARGING THE GATES OF THE FASHION ESTABLISHMENT BY EXPANDING THE CODES OF WHAT IT MEANS TO BE MASCULINE. CONSIDER THEM MENSWEAR’S NEW HOPE.

ASTRID ANDERSEN
City:
London and Copenhagen

Launched: 2011. My first show was for Fall, in February of that year. 

What was your breakout moment? I will always think back to my first feature in i-D; it was the first time I felt things moving beyond my own capacity. It was a whole page styled by Simon Foxton before I had even graduated from the Royal College of Art. Getting the finale catwalk at RCA for some reason feels very prestigious when you are there, and it felt like such an overwhelming appreciation of my work. 

How would you describe your Spring collection? It’s inspired by a stone collection I saw in Florence last summer. It had such a huge impact in terms of beauty, but also held the story of something very hard and strong yet sensitive in its spiritual aspects and delicate colors. These are the opposites I always try to find in my work. It’s what attracts me to men in general. The most prominent piece for me is the first outfit that went out on the catwalk: tight, fitted spandex with lace inserts, all white. This look was exactly what I wanted that season: very clean, with a nod to performancewear, with a fabric combination and cut that still looks very masculine while treading a fine line with feminine references. 

Do you have a personal philosophy when it comes to design? I strongly believe in physically being in a place that relaxes you, surrounded by people who matter, which is why my studio is in Copenhagen. It is essential for my work that I am comfortable in my everyday routines. Then I get to travel so much back and forth, which is amazing because I love London and feel very connected to the city. 

How has the response been to your Spring show? Every season I feel even more overwhelmed at the nice response to my work. It was my first solo show in London, so it was about defining a direction without labeling the brand too much. The real test is in impressing buyers, as they will really determine the future of the brand. This season sales stepped up and the right shops I’d been hoping for were excited. 

What’s next for Fall? I just showed Autumn 2014 last week and now I’m on my way to Paris to do sales. I’m also doing a very limited collaboration on a capsule with Topman, which I am super excited about. I feel honored to be working with them as I continue to receive their amazing support as part of NEWGEN. 


SIKI IM
City:
New York

Launched: 2009. My first show was at a factory in the Meatpacking District, before it was converted. It was my Lord of the Flies collection.

What was your breakout moment?  Fall 2010. Every collection is based in a certain subculture. This collection was the American Psycho–Wall Street collection, and it was when the recession hit. There was Jewish dressing, but there was also hard-core music. There were different cultures and I was trying to mix them.  

How would you describe your Spring collection? This collection is inspired by prisons and hospitals. I was reading Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment and there was this one passage where the protagonist talks about looking at these inmates and he feels like they appreciate life more than people outside the prison do, and I guess it makes sense. In life we take things for granted. And it is a happy topic, though it is about institutionalization and prison. I wanted to do a cute, paisley-ish print, but with tattoos, so my friend Maxime Buchi designed a print based on Russian prison tattoos. Some of them are actually my personal tattoos I have on my body. 

Do you have a personal philosophy when it comes to design? I’m fascinated by certain cultures. When I get close to something that moves me, usually it happens to be something more broken, more honest, and dark. But there is something poetic and redeeming about it; there’s always something good. It doesn’t need to be in-your-face or jolly, but personally I gravitate toward heavier subjects. I try to respect them and not create caricatures, but on the other hand I don’t want it to be too serious either. 

How has the response been to your Spring show? I was made fun of on Jimmy Kimmel and it really woke me up and showed me how stupid what I’m doing is when you take it out of context [laughs]. It was great. The plastic made an impact.

What’s next for Fall? We are deep into the new collection, and it’s going to be totally different. I can’t tell you too much so you should be surprised. One of the subjects is something I always hated, but it still intrigues me and I feel like it’s right now, so I’ve been researching and trying to make it my own. It’s so disgusting that I love it now. You’ll have to wait and see what it is. 


TELFAR
City: New York

Launched: 2004. I was selling genderless jersey styles that came in black, white, and gray. I shot the lookbooks with myself as the model. 

When did you experience a breakthrough? It happens each season when I see the final product of the collection. It’s always a breakthrough. 

How would you describe your Spring collection? It’s based on swim-inspired activewear, in terms of detail and functionality. Everything is adjustable. The details are similar to what you’d find on bikinis and board shorts, but remixed with casual items like dress shirts and khaki slacks. The waterproof nylon makes streetwear swim-capable. For the show, I collaborated with Babak Radboy of Shanzhai Biennial on a video lookbook that was adapted into another clothing line that we called Get-The-Look, featuring each look from the collection on a T-shirt. We used a 20-foot LED curtain to project video simultaneously, as the matching prerecorded model walked the runway—sixty models walked out to images of their own faces.  

Do you have a personal philosophy when it comes to design? Usefulness and functionality. If it doesn’t do anything for you, I won’t make it. 

How has the response been to your Spring show? Amazing. I feel like there was something for everyone in this collection, hence the title, Mainstream:Fluid. I also feel like it was groundbreaking in terms of what we created with video. Our content took on many different lives.   

What’s next for Fall? We are having a BIG show. I’m again collaborating with Shanzhai Biennial and we’re creating an extra-special release. Hint: it comes packaged in all sizes.

UMIT BENAN
City: Milan 

Launched: My first presentation was January 13, 2009. 

What was your breakout moment?  I presented my first collection on a Wednesday and after three days I had already gotten Suzy Menkes’s attention. She wrote a great article for the International Herald Tribune. The second defining moment would be my fifth season, when I presented the “Investment Bankers” collection. I think that’s when people understood I was going for something bigger and that I didn’t just have a young designer attitude.  The shapes and attitude were mature and it was a sexy collection that got everyone’s attention. When everyone was going skinny and young, I went for the experienced and sexy man. 

How would you describe your Spring collection? A political shout out to the government of Turkey, and the image I had of the Turkish movies about the Ottomans when I was a little kid. My favorite is the striped trench look. I find it extremely real Ottoman old-school and modern at the same time, but of course the mask completes the whole thing.

Do you have a personal philosophy when it comes to design?  I wait for everyone in the city to go to bed, then I find myself a safe angle and get to work. 

What’s next for Fall?  Technically, it’s about classic menswear, but my goal is to make a strong point to support “No To Racism” by using the life of an American hero, Jackie Robinson. 

EXTRA CREDITS

Hair Mark Hampton (Julian Watson Agency)  Grooming Dotti using Malin + Goetz (Streeters)  Models  Felix Reiss (DNA), Jan Aeberhard (NY Models), Kyle Mobus (Re:Quest), Abel Van Oeveren (VNY), Felix Liljefors and Kirill (Wilhelmina)  Digital technician Adam Leon  Prop stylist Eli Metcalf (Marek & Associates)  Photo assistants Ben Beagent, James  Broadribb, Corey Jenkins, Ben Mills  Stylist assistant Carrie Weidner  Hair assistants Tim and Yasuhiro  Grooming assistants Katie Robinson and Laura Stiassni  Production Bo Zhang (Management Artists)  Prop stylist assistants Brian Bustos and Roy Delgado  Retouching upperstudio.co.uk  Location Lightbox-NY  Catering Green Catering

MORE TO LOVE

NOSTALGHIA BACKSTAGE: HOUSE OF DAGMAR F/W \'14 FURVERTS SWEET SIXTEEN
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