VMAN31

ARTICLE NICOLE CATANESE

PHOTOGRAPHY RICHARD BURBRIDGE

STYLIST ROBBIE SPENCER

CREDITS ARTICLE CONTENTS

GURU 3.0

HBD BILL CUNNINGHAM

VANITY TREATMENTS

EXTRA CREDITS

Hair Dennis DeVoy using Phyto (Art Department)  Grooming Ralph Siciliano (D+V)  Model Yuri pleskun (Re:Quest)  Digital technician Andrew Kenney (Capture This Digital)  Photo assistants Kim Reenberg and Ben Wentzel  Stylist assistants Victor Cordero and Katy Fox  Grooming assistants Lucie Nguyen and Yohsuke Hiraka  Production Jessica Daly (Art + Commerce)  Production assistant Caron Lee (Art + Commerce)  Printing & retouching Norkin Digital Art, Ltd.  Casting Larissa Gunn (Art + Commerce)  Catering Dishful  Special thanks Naria Diaz Chi, L.Ac (Acupuncturist), Animals for Advertising

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VANITY TREATMENTS

PHOTOGRAPHY RICHARD BURBRIDGE
FASHION ROBBIE SPENCER
TEXT NICOLE CATANESE

COULD HARNESSING THE POWER OF MOTHER NATURE’S MOST EXOTIC RESOURCES BE THE SECRET TO REACHING SKIN NIRVANA?

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HONEY
Cleopatra was the first to make it chic to pour honey into baths—hers were milk—as well as all over one’s skin. And the Egyptian queen chose the natural humectant for good reason. Not only does it help increase hydration instantly, by drawing moisture from the air into the skin’s superficial layers, it’s also the Energizer bunny of hydrators, acting like a water magnet for deeper layers of skin too. While there are countless topical treatments that contain some form and amount of honey, nothing is as good a glow-getter as the real thing. Case in point: the Paris Roof Top Honey Facial, an hour-long signature treatment at the Six Senses Spa at The Westin Paris VendÔme hotel ($198, thewestinparis.com), where honey whipped up by bees that call the Tuileries home is slathered on your face while you lie in a cocoonlike room overlooking Paris. Sweet.

SNAILS
Creepy-crawlies have long played a vital role in medicine and healing. One in particular that’s received a bit of buzz lately: snails. “Ingredients found in snail slime are being used in Asia and Europe to help rejuvenate skin,” explains Shirley Madhere, MD, a plastic surgeon in New York City and founder of The New Aesthete practice (thenewaesthete.com). “Snail secretion contains glycolic acid, antioxidants, hyaluronic acid, and elastin, all known to have antiaging properties.” Translation: they stimulate skin-plumping collagen and elastin as well as repair photo damage. Try the Snail and Pace Signature Meriden Face Massage at the Simply Divine Alternative Spa, in the U.K. (about $340 for six treatments, thebathhousecorby.com), which lets farmed (not straight-from-the-garden) snails slowly work their way around your face, leaving behind an ice-cold slime that’s then massaged into your skin. Want the softening sans snails creeping on you? Immunocologie Super 7 Elixir Firming Complex ($300, shop.immunocologie.com) contains the mucus of the slimy gastropods in its cocktail of turn-back-the-clock superchargers.

SEAWEED
Among the oldest of life forms, seaweed has been used for centuries to heal wounds. Although beauty brands have looked to capture the skin-perfecting power of marine extracts in a jar, some spas are going right to the source. “Seaweed contains an abundance of minerals, and while it is most often used as an anticellulite treatment, it has many other benefits, such as detoxification, softening, and reducing water retention,” says Grant Lessard, assistant spa director at The Ritz-Carlton spa in Naples, Florida, which offers an Organic Seaweed Leaf Body Wrap that can be customized for the face as well ($240 for 80 minutes, theritzcarlton.com). Vermont’s Stowe Mountain Lodge Voya Organic Restorative Facial ($225 for 80 minutes, stowemountainlodge.com) places harvested wild seaweed in hot water to allow its natural moisturizing gels to be released, and then each leaf is carefully wrapped across your face, infusing skin with countless essential minerals.

SALT
From the Dead Sea (said to have nearly nine times more salt than a typical ocean) to Iceland’s Blue Lagoon, bathing in salty waters—which skyrockets the mineral content of skin—is an undisputed antiaging agent. At the latter, a breathtaking communal indoor-outdoor spa is built into the country’s largest natural hot spring. Unlike a standard table-salt solution, which actually decreases moisture, geothermal seawater rich in mineral salt has been shown to solve a wide range of complexion concerns, from acne to dryness. The Blue Lagoon 90-minute Facial Deluxe (about $150 for 90 minutes, bluelagoon.com) pampers parched skin with a massage, silica mask, and an über-rich cream. The Four Seasons Nevis spa’s Hydrating Mineral Mask ($230 for 80 minutes, fourseasons.com) incorporates a sea-salt exfoliation all over the body to rev circulation and buff skin insanely smooth.

ACUPUNCTURE
A licensed acupuncturist who offers facial sessions at her NYC practice ($1,100 for five 70-minute sessions; acunaria.com), Naria D. Chi started sticking clients in the face after witnessing the technique’s skin-smoothing and face-lift-like effects on an elderly patient. “I have worked with her for a year,” she says, “as well as with others, and I’m convinced that facial acupuncture not only revitalizes your internal health but also captures your glow and holds off signs of aging.” The source of such powers? “Facial acupuncture works because the needling causes microtraumas in the skin to which the body responds by increasing blood flow and the production of collagen and elastin, for wound healing,” explains Chi, who suggests twice-weekly sessions for around ten weeks total. “The needling, which is done at the level of the dermis, may also stimulate neurotransmitter production,” she adds. Most important is what you’ll see in the mirror: softer, firmer, line-free skin.

SNAKE VENOM
Researchers have yet to debut Botox in a bottle, so for now synthetic snake venom is the best thing going. “An ingredient found in snake venom has been shown to temporarily inhibit muscle activity, and is therefore, like Botox, considered a neurotoxin,” explains Dr. Madhere. “So, when applied topically, it can help reduce wrinkles, to a certain degree.” Recently, the U.K.-based skincare company Rodial teamed up with select Equinox spas in the U.S. to debut their Freeze Facial ($225 for 80 minutes, equinox.com), which incorporates intense facial massage with a range of Rodial Glamtox products, including their Snake Serum ($162, nordstrom.com) and Glamtox Snake Mask ($83, nordstrom.com). Both incorporate a synthetic snake venom neuropeptide (aka syn-ake) to iron out expression lines and deeper wrinkles as well as give a tightening sensation all over.

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EXTRA CREDITS

Hair Dennis DeVoy using Phyto (Art Department)  Grooming Ralph Siciliano (D+V)  Model Yuri pleskun (Re:Quest)  Digital technician Andrew Kenney (Capture This Digital)  Photo assistants Kim Reenberg and Ben Wentzel  Stylist assistants Victor Cordero and Katy Fox  Grooming assistants Lucie Nguyen and Yohsuke Hiraka  Production Jessica Daly (Art + Commerce)  Production assistant Caron Lee (Art + Commerce)  Printing & retouching Norkin Digital Art, Ltd.  Casting Larissa Gunn (Art + Commerce)  Catering Dishful  Special thanks Naria Diaz Chi, L.Ac (Acupuncturist), Animals for Advertising

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NEXT GEN THE POWER AND THE GLORY BIJOUX KISSES GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY
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